Catnip flowers and mint leaves
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Summer Tea Blends & Self Care

Disclaimer: I am not an expert by any means. Not a therapist, medical or mental health professional. I do not diagnose, treat, or tell people what to do. The main purpose of this website and blog is education and support. If you are unsure how the suggestions and resources here may affect you, please discuss any changes to your existing treatment plan with your medical and mental health providers first.

Summer Tea Blends

I don’t have a specific name for these blends aka recipes. The first one came from a garden experiment and curiosity.

Lemon Balm (Melissa officinalis) is the topic of my aromatherapy research paper. As an essential oil, Melissa officinalis has similar properties to the herbs and a lot more safety precautions for use. As an herb, though, the reverse is true. There are few safety precautions with using the whole herb compared to just the essential oil.

Then my herbal instructors at CommonWealth Herbs shared a sun tea recipe with us during a Q&A session that inspired me to make my own with orange peel – second recipe. The flavor surprised me as I was expecting something bitter and refreshing. Instead I got a nice balance between bitter and sour with some fresh herby flavors too.

These dried herbs come from Mountain Rose Herbs

Blend 1 - Lowers stress, feels good, without sleepiness

Tools & Ingredients:

  • 1 mesh strainer
  • 1 glass mason jar with lid (this example uses a 16 oz jar)
  • Kettle with boiling water
  • oven mitts to handle hot glass
  • Fresh, dried or combination of the following herbs
    • Melissa officinalis (Lemon Balm)
    • Nepeta cataria (Catnip)
    • Menta spicata (Spearmint)

Instructions:

  1. Add about 0.5-1 inch of herbs to the bottom of the mason jar
    1. My herbal instructors recommend using that much to make a strong tea
    2. You can use more or less depending on preference
  2. Add the boiling water and cover tight
  3. Shake the jar gently to mix the herbs and water
  4. Let sit for at least 5 minutes or until the water turns the color you want
    1. Darker color = stronger tea
    2. Fresh herbs take longer to break down, so you need to boil longer
    3. This is called a short hot infusion
  5. Use the strainer to pour tea into your favorite cup
  6. Add more hot water to the herbs for another brew – it’s good for at least 2-3 more uses

Window Sill Sun Tea

Tools & Ingredients:

  • 1 mesh strainer
  • Room Temperature or cold water
  • 1 glass mason jar with lid (this example uses a 16 oz jar)
  • Sunny flat space to hold a mason jar
  • Fresh, dried or combination of the following herbs*
    • Orange Peel (Citrus Sinesis)
    • Snow Chrysanthemum flowers (Coreopsis tinctoria Nutt.)
    • Rose petals (Rosa damascena)

*All the herbs in this recipe are dried versions*

Instructions:

  1. Add about 0.5-1 inch of herbs to the bottom of the mason jar
    1. My herbal instructors recommend using that much to make a strong tea
    2. You can use more or less depending on preference
  2. Add the water and cover tight
  3. Shake the jar gently to mix the herbs and water
  4. Let the jar sit in the sun (outside or in front of a sunny window) for 6-8 hours
    1. Darker color = stronger tea
    2. I am lazy and made mine the night before; then put it on the window sill to catch morning light
    3. This is called sun tea since the sun does all the hard work for us
  5. Use the strainer to pour tea into your favorite cup
  6. I am not sure if this will be good for another use or not; did not try it last time.

But I'm not an herbal student...where do I get the ingredients and tools?

For Tools:

I buy most of my tools from grocery stores, kitchen stores, and garden centers.

If you are on a tight budget, try dollar stores and thrift stores for mesh strainers, and other tools.

Look for open box or used and new tea kettles, glass jars, and other electrics.

Sometimes online stores have sales too.

For herbs and edible flowers:

Try your local garden center for seeds and starter plants.

Farmer’s market, farm stands, and tea companies often sell fresh and dried herbs too. They sell locally and online.

It takes some research, but I found Instagram and Pinterest makes finding sellers a lot easier.

More Recipes and Links

If you want to try some of my other tea blends and recipes, check out these links:

Love and Rainbows,

TJ

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